ABOUT US
BOARD MEMBERS
The Hampton Roads Regional Jail Authority is managed by a board consisting of the Sheriff, City Manager and City Council members representing each participating jurisdiction.  Listed below is an updated roster of active board members:  
City of Norfolk
City of Newport News
City of Hampton
City of Chesapeake
Robert C. Ike Jr.

Council Member



John de Triquet

Alternate



Jim O
Sullivan

Sheriff



Clayton Bennett

Alternate



James E. Baker

City Manager



Robert Geis

Alternate


Chris Snead

Council Member



Jimmy Gray

Alternate



B. J. Roberts

Sheriff



Karen E. Bowden


Alternate



Mary B. Bunting


City Manager



Brian DeProfio


Alternate


Sharon P. Scott

Council Member



Patricia P. Woodbury

Alternate



Gabriel A. Morgan


Sheriff



Eileen Sprinkle

Alternate



James M. Bourey


City Manager



Alan Archer

Alternate


Martin Thomas

Council Member



TBD


Alternate



Joseph Baron

Sheriff



Major Mike O’Toole

Alternate



Doug Smith


City Manager



Betty Meyer


Alternate


Interim Superintendent
Hampton Roads Regional Jail
Ronaldo Myers
City of Portsmouth
Curtis E. Edmonds Sr.

Chairman



William E. Moody Jr.

Alternate



William O. Watson

Sheriff



William Rucker

Alternate



Lydia Pettis Patton

City Manager



TBD

Alternate


HRRJ BOARD MEMBERS
HRRJ HISTORY
The Hampton Roads Regional Jail opened in March, 1998 and has been in continuous operation since that time.  The five member jurisdictions choose which inmates are sent to the Regional Jail and to a great extent they are inmates with medical, mental health, or disciplinary problems.

In March 2016, the Hampton Roads Regional Jail celebrated its eighteenth anniversary of providing services to its member cities.  The establishment of the Regional Jail has been an outstanding success, and it is fulfilling its basic purpose of reducing overcrowding in the four member cities’ jails.  The contribution provided by the Regional Jail, however, is much greater than simply holding approximately 1300 inmates from the member city jails.  This is because the Regional Jail houses a disproportionately large number of inmates who are difficult to manage.  The Regional Jail houses the majority of the inmates from the five jurisdictions with severe medical and mental health needs and essentially serves as the medical and mental health correctional facility for the member cities.
The Hampton Roads Regional Jail Authority continues to be an excellent example of regional cooperation!
HRRJ HISTORY
The Hampton Roads Regional Jail opened in March, 1998 and has been in continuous operation since that time.  The five member jurisdictions choose which inmates are sent to the Regional Jail and to a great extent they are inmates with medical, mental health, or disciplinary problems.

While it originally was established to house general overcrowding, it has since evolved into managing inmates with medical and mental health issues or disciplinary problems.  The two-story structure is divided into three separate and distinct housing units.  The housing units are at the corners of a large central rectangular area, which contains the kitchen, laundry, intake area, command center, training area, classification, administration, and health services.

In March 2016, the Hampton Roads Regional Jail celebrated its eighteenth anniversary of providing services to its member cities.  The establishment of the Regional Jail has been an outstanding success, and it is fulfilling its basic purpose of reducing overcrowding in the four member cities’ jails.  The contribution provided by the Regional Jail, however, is much greater than simply holding approximately 1300 inmates from the member city jails.  This is because the Regional Jail houses a disproportionately large number of inmates who are difficult to manage.  The Regional Jail houses the majority of the inmates from the five jurisdictions with severe medical and mental health needs and essentially serves as the medical and mental health correctional facility for the member cities.  Significantly more difficult and overcrowded conditions would exist in the facilities of the five member jurisdictions today were it not for the establishment of the Hampton Roads Regional Jail.
The Hampton Roads Regional Jail Authority
continues to be an excellent example of regional cooperation!
Located in the city of Portsmouth, the Hampton Roads Regional Jail was formed as a regional solution to local jail overcrowding in the cities of Chesapeake, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk and Portsmouth.  The Hampton Roads Regional Jail Authority was established in 1993 as authorized by the Virginia State Code, to develop, construct, equip, maintain and operate the Regional Jail. 

The Hampton Roads Regional Jail opened in March, 1998 and has been in continuous operation since that time.  The five member jurisdictions choose which inmates are sent to the Regional Jail and to a great extent they are inmates with medical, mental health, or disciplinary problems.

While it originally was established to house general overcrowding, it has since evolved into managing inmates with medical and mental health issues or disciplinary problems.  The two-story structure is divided into three separate and distinct housing units.  The housing units are at the corners of a large central rectangular area, which contains the kitchen, laundry, intake area, command center, training area, classification, administration, and health services.

In March 2016, the Hampton Roads Regional Jail celebrated its eighteenth anniversary of providing services to its member cities.  The establishment of the Regional Jail has been an outstanding success, and it is fulfilling its basic purpose of reducing overcrowding in the four member cities’ jails.  The contribution provided by the Regional Jail, however, is much greater than simply holding approximately 1300 inmates from the member city jails.  This is because the Regional Jail houses a disproportionately large number of inmates who are difficult to manage.  The Regional Jail houses the majority of the inmates from the five jurisdictions with severe medical and mental health needs and essentially serves as the medical and mental health correctional facility for the member cities.  Significantly more difficult and overcrowded conditions would exist in the facilities of the five member jurisdictions today were it not for the establishment of the Hampton Roads Regional Jail.
The Hampton Roads Regional Jail Authority continues to be an excellent example of regional cooperation!
HRRJ HISTORY
HRRJ HISTORY
Virginia Department of Corrections

Virginia, from the time of the first settlement at Jamestown to the relocation of the state capital to Richmond in the late 1700’s, relied upon corporal and capital punishment as its penal measures. Gradually, Virginia began to use small county jails for sentences of confinement...
American Corrections Association

For more than 143 years, the American Correctional Association has championed the cause of corrections and correctional effectiveness. Founded in 1870 as the National Prison Association, ACA is the oldest association developed specifically for practitioners in the correctional profession...
Virginia Association of Regional Jails

The summer of 1988, the regional jail superintendents at the time decided to meet periodically to discuss common concerns and to determine how their jails could be enhanced....
American Jail Association

The American Jail Association staff and Board of Directors are here to serve you and all the jails across our great Nation. We represent the smallest of jails to the largest. Please feel free to contact us with any questions, concerns, and suggestions...
National Commission on Correctional Health Care

In 2013 the National Commission on Correctional Health Care celebrated its 30th year since incorporation. NCCHC’s origins date to the early 1970s, when an American Medical Association study of jails found inadequate, disorganized health services and a lack of national standards...
HRRJ ACCREDITATIONS
The Hampton Roads Regional Jail opened in March, 1998 and has been in continuous operation since that time.  The five member jurisdictions choose which inmates are sent to the Regional Jail and to a great extent they are inmates with medical, mental health, or disciplinary problems.

While it originally was established to house general overcrowding, it has since evolved into managing inmates with medical and mental health issues or disciplinary problems.  The two-story structure is divided into three separate and distinct housing units.  The housing units are at the corners of a large central rectangular area, which contains the kitchen, laundry, intake area, command center, training area, classification, administration, and health services.

In March 2016, the Hampton Roads Regional Jail celebrated its eighteenth anniversary of providing services to its member cities.  The establishment of the Regional Jail has been an outstanding success, and it is fulfilling its basic purpose of reducing overcrowding in the four member cities’ jails.  The contribution provided by the Regional Jail, however, is much greater than simply holding approximately 1300 inmates from the member city jails.  This is because the Regional Jail houses a disproportionately large number of inmates who are difficult to manage.  The Regional Jail houses the majority of the four cities’ inmates with severe medical and mental health needs and essentially serves as the medical and mental health correctional facility for the member cities.  Significantly more difficult and overcrowded conditions would exist in the four cities’ jails today were it not for the establishment of the Hampton Roads Regional Jail.
The Hampton Roads Regional Jail Authority continues to be an excellent example of regional cooperation!
FREEDOM OF INFO
The Virginia Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), located § 2.2-3700 et seq. of the Code of Virginia, guarantees citizens of the Commonwealth and representatives of the media access to public records held by public bodies, public officials, and public employees.


A public record is any writing or recording - regardless of whether it is a paper record, an electronic file, an audio or video recording, or any other format - that is prepared or owned by, or in the possession of a public body or its officers, employees or agents in the transaction of public business. All public records are presumed to be open, and may only be withheld if a specific, statutory exemption applies.

The policy of FOIA states that the purpose of FOIA is to promote an increased awareness by all persons of governmental activities. In furthering this policy, FOIA requires that the law be interpreted liberally, in favor of access, and that any exemption allowing public records to be withheld must be interpreted narrowly.

Your FOIA Rights…Click here for the full FOIA Policy
FREEDOM OF INFORMATION REQUESTS
ABOUT US
HRRJ
HISTORY
BOARD
MEMBERS
HRRJ
ACCREDITATIONS
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ABOUT US
HRRJ
HISTORY
BOARD
MEMBERS
HRRJ
ACCREDITATIONS
FREEDOM OF
INFORMATION
HRRJ HISTORY
The Hampton Roads Regional Jail opened in March, 1998 and has been in continuous operation since that time.  The five member jurisdictions choose which inmates are sent to the Regional Jail and to a great extent they are inmates with medical, mental health, or disciplinary problems.

While it originally was established to house general overcrowding, it has since evolved into managing inmates with medical and mental health issues or disciplinary problems.  The two-story structure is divided into three separate and distinct housing units.  The housing units are at the corners of a large central rectangular area, which contains the kitchen, laundry, intake area, command center, training area, classification, administration, and health services.

In March 2016, the Hampton Roads Regional Jail celebrated its eighteenth anniversary of providing services to its member cities.  The establishment of the Regional Jail has been an outstanding success, and it is fulfilling its basic purpose of reducing overcrowding in the four member cities’ jails.  The contribution provided by the Regional Jail, however, is much greater than simply holding approximately 1300 inmates from the member city jails.  This is because the Regional Jail houses a disproportionately large number of inmates who are difficult to manage.  The Regional Jail houses the majority of the inmates from the five jurisdictions with severe medical and mental health needs and essentially serves as the medical and mental health correctional facility for the member cities.  Significantly more difficult and overcrowded conditions would exist in the facilities of the five member jurisdictions today were it not for the establishment of the Hampton Roads Regional Jail.
The Hampton Roads Regional Jail Authority
continues to be an excellent example of regional cooperation!
ABOUT US
BOARD
MEMBERS
HRRJ
ACCREDITATIONS
FREEDOM OF
INFORMATION
Copyright © 2016 Hampton Roads Regional Jail Authority. All Rights Reserved.  Designed by Sgt. Phillips, S.
Copyright © 2016 Hampton Roads Regional Jail Authority. All Rights Reserved.
Designed by
Sgt. Phillips, S.
Copyright © 2016 Hampton Roads Regional Jail Authority. All Rights Reserved.  Designed by Sgt. Phillips, S.
Copyright © 2016 Hampton Roads Regional Jail Authority. All Rights Reserved.  Designed by
Sgt. Phillips, S.
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